Stories from the month of May

And what do MayStories bring?

• Cat Rambo’s near-future SF story, “A Man and His Parasite,” appeared in SQ Magazine, and odd little flash piece “Spiders, Centipedes, and Holes” came out in The Journal of Unlikely Entomology.

• Emily C. Skaftun’s “The Taking Tree” was published in Daily Science Fiction. Just a little revenge for the Giving Tree.

• Two stories from E. Lily Yu appeared this month: “Ilse, Who Saw Clearly” in Apex Magazine and “The Forgetting Shiraz” in the Boston Review.

April stories. Yay!

• Caren Gussoff’s “Section iii,” originally published in Abyss and Apex, was podcast(ed?) by Dark Fiction.

• Cat Rambo’s “Soft,” which she describes as “overly didactic science fiction flash,” appeared in Daily Science Fiction. 

• “The Fisher Queen,” also by Cat, was published in Fish. It’s an Excerpt from the Arthurian cycle set on the Outer Banks.

• And in more Cat Rambo news (yay, Cat!), “Dagger and Mask”–space opera assassin and pirate captain–appeared in The Other Half of the Sky.

• Emily C. Skaftun’s “Final Testament of a Weapons Engineer” was published in After Death. In it a dead man must prevent his children from stumbling onto the booby trap he set for himself.

“Melt With You,” also by Emily (and permit me to squee, for this is me!), appeared in Clarkesworld. It’s a tale of religious war among garden decorations. Also available in audio.

Happy 2013, y’all! Here are some HM publications/news to get the year started.

• Sandra M. Odell’s “The Poison Eater” appeared in the anthology Deep Cuts from Evil Jester Press.

• Eliza Hirsch’s story “A Map of the Heart” came out in Con(viction): Anthology of the Con.

“The Passing of Grandmother’s Quilt” by Cat Rambo appeared on Every Day Fiction. It’s a flash piece about the grieving process.

• Issue #16 of Shimmer came out this month, with editing by Keffy R.M. Kehrli.

• January’s issue of The Colored Lens contained stories by TWO miscuers. Kris Millering’s “Those Who Do Not Reap” is about aliens, alien sex, and how stories grow. Emily C. Skaftun’s “A Fairy Tale” is a cautionary tale about firefly hunting, magic, and relationships.

• The stage version of Liz Argall’s “Dear Ms. Moon” was/will be performed January 26th and February 2 as part of Pulp Diction. If you missed the shows you can read or listen to the story.

• And finally, Bloodchildren: Stories by the Octavia E. Butler Scholars, is available now, with stories by ANOTHER TWO miscuers! Not only will you get Caren Gussoff’s new novel start, “Free Bird,” and Erik Owomoyela’s “Steal the Sky,” but the proceeds from the book support the Carl Brandon Society, which helps more awesome people attend Clarion and Clarion West. The anthology is only available until June.

Remember, remember! The month of December!

In all the excitement about the end of the year I kind of forgot that December is also a month. And yet, Miscuers still published things!

• One of them is a book! Sandra M. Odell’s The Twelve Ways of Christmas was released by Hydra House. Publishers Weekly calls it “a bewitching enterprise.”

• Caren Gussof was part of a GalleyCat crew who rewrote the mostest purplest vampire book ever, “Varney the Vampire.” It’s free at https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/266802

• Caren’s story “Anything Chocolate” is also live now at Toasted Cake. Yum!

• Cat Rambo’s story “Events at Fort Plentitude,” which originally appeared in Weird Tales, was podcastified by Tales to Terrify. It features a frontier rife with fox and snake women, frozen soldiers, and flying demons.

• Emily C. Skaftun’s “The Red Sno-Cones Are Not for Sale” appeared at Every Day Fiction. It’s a “chilling” tale of ice-cream trucks gone bad.

Another month . . .

Another bunch of stories to read! This November has seen:

• Caren Gussoff’s short, “The Moon Illusion,” is at mixer. I could describe it, but you may as well just read it. Go on!

• Sandra M. Odell’s “Dining with Salmoxis” is now up at Goldfish Grimm’s Spicy Fiction Sushi. It was written from the shadows.

• Emily C. Skaftun’s not-particularly-SF story, “Like Braces for Broken Teeth,” is at Every Day Fiction. Read it to find out what roads eat.

• and, last but not least, Derek Zumsteg’s novelette, “Musici,” is in the latest issue of Electric Velocipede.

Horrific October Publications

Or rather, publications by Horrific Miscuers. They may or may not themselves be horrific.

• “Casanova Clay,” a poem by Liz Argall about dirt, hands and work awaits you at Apex Magazine. 

• Cat Rambo steals the month once again with two (2) ebooks! A SEED ON THE WIND is part of the Fathomless Abyss series, and HALLOWEEN QUARTET is an experiment.

• And Emily C. Skaftun’s “10 Things to Do in Los Angeles After You Die” was published by Every Day Fiction. It’s a zombie love story tourist guide.

Horrific Miscue Stories in their (Un)Natural Habitats

This is not an April Fools Day post. Or is it?

These are some of the places that Horrific Miscuers’ stories have gotten to this March:

  • Liz Argall’s “The Rugged Track” is available as a podcast from Podcastle
  • Lauren Dixon’s “A Lesson in Metempsychosis” is at Extract(s)
  • Sandra M. Odell’s “Wings” is in issue #3 of The Colored Lens
  • Emily C. Skaftun’s “Down in the Woods Today” is in Attic Toys, available in kindle and paper formats

We hope you enjoy. Unless, of course, it’s all an elaborate prank.

From the March 3 2012 Meeting

Writers Hard At Work

Tod McCoy, Lauren Dixon, Liz Argall at Inner Chapters Bookstore.

Liz Wrestles With Her Muse

Liz Argall wrestles with her muse while Lauren Dixon (furthest) and VIcki Saunders (foreground) look on.

Lucas Johnson, Emily Skaftun, Persephone D'Shaun

Lucas Johnson, Emily Skaftun, and Persephone D'Shaun watch from the other side of the table.

Members present: Liz Argall, Lauren Dixon, Eliza Hirsch, Lucas Johnson, Keffy Kehrli, Tod McCoy, Cat Rambo, Vicki Saunders, Persephone D’Shaun, Emily Skaftun.

Three stories were workshopped and Liz wrestled with her muse. As always, Inner Chapters was a swell host. The novel group meets on the 24th, and we all believe we are workshopping Caren’s novel.

Also, Keffy is going to put together an informative list of everything he hates in stories for the blog.

Welcome home, sunshine!

Definitely not the same rain.

Hi. My name’s Emily C. Skaftun, and I grew up here in Seattle. And I just moved here six months ago. It wasn’t like moving to a whole new place, but neither was it coming home again.

I moved away at 18 to escape the gloom and the rain, but this rain doesn’t rattle me at all. It isn’t the same rain.

I have family and high school friends around, but I barely see them these days. I’ve made new friends of neighbors and baristas. But even better, I’ve plugged back into the community of writers I met at Clarion West in 2009—these people, Horrific Miscue!

So what am I? Am I a stranger here, or a local? Like all the other writers, I live in the otherworlds, with people who don’t exist in places I make from words. Yet we Miscuers (miscreants?) share those worlds, and words.

And now we’re going to blog about them (and using them) too. We promise. So, hi, theoretical reader. If you’d like to know more about me, check out my own often-neglected blog at skaftun.blogspot.com.