September Publications

Sorry these are so late. But look what wonders September held!

• Neile Graham had two poems, “Ksampguiyaeps—Woman-Out-To-Sea” and “Hermitage,” in Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet 29.

• Sandra M. Odell’s “Listening to It Rain,” a story of  loneliness, love, and coming of age after death, appeared in Fireside Magazine.

• Cat Rambo had audio reprints of “Five Ways to Fall in Love on Planet Porcelain” and “Grandmother’s Road Trip” in Drabblecast and Tales to Terrify, respectively, as well as a Portuguese reprint, “Os Primos de Kallakak” in Dagon.

• Cat’s new fiction publications include “To Read the Sea,” published in What Fates Imposeand “Of Selkies, Disco Balls, and Anna Plane,” a story of lesbian wereseals, in Glitter and Mayhem.

Stories from the month of July

Happy summer! Here’s some stuff to read.

• Liz Argall’s “Blunt Force Trauma Delivered by Spouse,” in the much-anticipated This is How You Die (the second Machine of Death anthology) is “a graphic, painful character study of an Australian farmer in a passionate but abusive relationship, fighting to rebuild her life in spite of her eponymous prediction” (Tasha Robinson of AV Club).

• Cat Rambo has two stories out: “On the Big-fisted Circuit,” a story about people fighting in giant robot suits, is up at Daily Science Fiction, and “Elsewhere, Within, Elsewhen” is in Beyond the Sun, an anthology. It’s about personal struggles in a distant colony. Also, talking rocks.

• JM Sidorova’s debut novel, The Age of Ice, was published this month, along with a companion story called “The Colors of Cold.” I haven’t read my copy of the novel yet, but the reviews are hot! So to speak.

June Stories

• Lauren Dixon’s “Your Words are Your Life, Your Death,” a non-fiction blog post about writing, death, and aging, was posted on Booklife Now.

• Sandra M. Odell’s “The Dictionary’s Apprentice” showed up at the Cast of Wonders YA podcast.

• And according to Leah Bobet, publisher of Ideomancer, Miscuer Vicki Saunders’s “‘Deus Ex Chelonia’” takes us on the most whimsical post-apocalyptic quest we’ve read in years and years.”

Happy Independence day, everyone!

Stories from the month of May

And what do MayStories bring?

• Cat Rambo’s near-future SF story, “A Man and His Parasite,” appeared in SQ Magazine, and odd little flash piece “Spiders, Centipedes, and Holes” came out in The Journal of Unlikely Entomology.

• Emily C. Skaftun’s “The Taking Tree” was published in Daily Science Fiction. Just a little revenge for the Giving Tree.

• Two stories from E. Lily Yu appeared this month: “Ilse, Who Saw Clearly” in Apex Magazine and “The Forgetting Shiraz” in the Boston Review.

April stories. Yay!

• Caren Gussoff’s “Section iii,” originally published in Abyss and Apex, was podcast(ed?) by Dark Fiction.

• Cat Rambo’s “Soft,” which she describes as “overly didactic science fiction flash,” appeared in Daily Science Fiction. 

• “The Fisher Queen,” also by Cat, was published in Fish. It’s an Excerpt from the Arthurian cycle set on the Outer Banks.

• And in more Cat Rambo news (yay, Cat!), “Dagger and Mask”–space opera assassin and pirate captain–appeared in The Other Half of the Sky.

• Emily C. Skaftun’s “Final Testament of a Weapons Engineer” was published in After Death. In it a dead man must prevent his children from stumbling onto the booby trap he set for himself.

“Melt With You,” also by Emily (and permit me to squee, for this is me!), appeared in Clarkesworld. It’s a tale of religious war among garden decorations. Also available in audio.

March Madness: Stories!

It was an explosive month for horrific miscuers! Look at all this great fiction!

• Liz Argall had two amazing stories published this month. “Shadow Play,” a story of shapeshifting, memory, and the history of puppets, inspired by random banter with William Alexander over twitter, is at Daily Science Fiction. And “Mermaid’s Hook” is at Apex: Rescuing a sailor is not as easy as it sounds. Fellow miscuer Rashida Smith calls it “haunting and deeply satisfying.” And! Proceeds from this story go to the Leonard Pung Memorial Scholarship.

• Eliza Hirsch’s “A Song for the Season” is at Cast of Wonders in audio form. It’s a story of love and tragedy in a village setting.

• “Logic and Magic in the Time of the Boat Lift” by Cat Rambo (with Ben Burgis) is available in word form at Giganotosaurus and audio word form at Podcastle. Paraconsistent logic, oracular nuns, and were-gators in 1980s Miami!

• Cat Rambo also has an audio reprint, “Amid the Words of War,” available at Drabblecast. It’s a story about an alien POW turned sex worker.

• And E. Lily Yu introduces us to a new treatment for grief in “Loss, with Chalk Diagrams,” up at Eclipse Online.

Amazing, right? I can’t wait to see what we get up to in April!

Short month, happy reading

Okay, so I missed the end of February as it zoomed by (lousy short month!), but better late than never, here are your February publications by Horrific Miscuers:

• In Cat Rambo’s “Love’s Footsteps,” published in Daily Science Fiction, a wizard preserves his heart in order not to age, then regrets it.

• The month also saw audio reprints of two of Cat’s stories: “Clockwork Fairies” is in Steampunk Specs, a compilation of 8 hours worth of steampunk, including stories by Christopher Barzak, Eileen Gunn, Margo Lanagan, Nick Mamatas, Cherie Priest, and Michael Swanwick. “RealFur” from Near+Far, a story about the best fur coat ever, is on Bizarrocast.

• Sandra M. Odell’s “David Milner Is” is in Tales to Terrify. It’s a story of what it means to be a good man.

• And, back to Cat Rambo, she’s been nominated for a Nebula Award! Check out “Five Ways to Fall in Love on Planet Porcelain,” which appeared in her story collection Near + Far.

Happy 2013, y’all! Here are some HM publications/news to get the year started.

• Sandra M. Odell’s “The Poison Eater” appeared in the anthology Deep Cuts from Evil Jester Press.

• Eliza Hirsch’s story “A Map of the Heart” came out in Con(viction): Anthology of the Con.

“The Passing of Grandmother’s Quilt” by Cat Rambo appeared on Every Day Fiction. It’s a flash piece about the grieving process.

• Issue #16 of Shimmer came out this month, with editing by Keffy R.M. Kehrli.

• January’s issue of The Colored Lens contained stories by TWO miscuers. Kris Millering’s “Those Who Do Not Reap” is about aliens, alien sex, and how stories grow. Emily C. Skaftun’s “A Fairy Tale” is a cautionary tale about firefly hunting, magic, and relationships.

• The stage version of Liz Argall’s “Dear Ms. Moon” was/will be performed January 26th and February 2 as part of Pulp Diction. If you missed the shows you can read or listen to the story.

• And finally, Bloodchildren: Stories by the Octavia E. Butler Scholars, is available now, with stories by ANOTHER TWO miscuers! Not only will you get Caren Gussoff’s new novel start, “Free Bird,” and Erik Owomoyela’s “Steal the Sky,” but the proceeds from the book support the Carl Brandon Society, which helps more awesome people attend Clarion and Clarion West. The anthology is only available until June.

Remember, remember! The month of December!

In all the excitement about the end of the year I kind of forgot that December is also a month. And yet, Miscuers still published things!

• One of them is a book! Sandra M. Odell’s The Twelve Ways of Christmas was released by Hydra House. Publishers Weekly calls it “a bewitching enterprise.”

• Caren Gussof was part of a GalleyCat crew who rewrote the mostest purplest vampire book ever, “Varney the Vampire.” It’s free at https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/266802

• Caren’s story “Anything Chocolate” is also live now at Toasted Cake. Yum!

• Cat Rambo’s story “Events at Fort Plentitude,” which originally appeared in Weird Tales, was podcastified by Tales to Terrify. It features a frontier rife with fox and snake women, frozen soldiers, and flying demons.

• Emily C. Skaftun’s “The Red Sno-Cones Are Not for Sale” appeared at Every Day Fiction. It’s a “chilling” tale of ice-cream trucks gone bad.